The Best Roofing Hammer For Roofers

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The Best Roofing Hammer For Roofers

If you prefer being hands-on with home maintenance, it’s essential to keep a complete set of tools.

Imagine if you could use only one tool to get any repair done? You’d no longer have to sift through your toolbox.

A roofing hammer is essential to take on any construction project. It’s a versatile and precise tool to get the job done fast.

Read on below, as I guide you through the best roofing hammers you should get your hands on!

What Is a Roofing Hammer?

A roofing hammer is also known as a roofing hatchet. You can use it to pound or pry off nails in roofing works.

What makes it vital is how it offers a variety of uses than your ordinary hammer.

When re-roofing, you can use it to claw off tiles, shakes, and shingles.

For precision and efficiency, roofing hammers are your best tools. They do a great job of securing the nails on the shingles.

A roof hammer also has a built-in gauge to help you set proper shingle exposure.

If you’re planning to work on a roof installation, getting a good roofing hatchet is essential for you. Here are 4 of the best roofing hammers we recommend using.

Top 4 Roofing Hammers of 2020

AJC Magnet Roofing Hatchet: Best Overall

The AJC Magnet Roofing Hatchet is a wood and steel roofing hatchet [R]. This sturdy hammer boasts a challenging build.

Size-wise, it’s 13.5 inches with a 12.5-inch handle and 6.5-inch head. It’s also 1.64 lbs in weight.

Among other roofing hatchets, it’s one of the most reliable for complex roofing repairs.

The hammer comes built with a utility knife, nail claw, and sliding gauge. Should you wish to replace or adjust its gauge, you can opt for this.

When it comes to functionality, it offers a comfortable grip for hassle-free use. Its wooden base is lightweight and absorbs shock well.

You can strike a nail with precision through its neodymium magnet surface. Its head also comes with a serrated face.

If you’re after a roofing hammer with a variety of features, the AJC Magnet is best for you!

PROS:

  • Head is a magnetic holder for nails
  • Head comes with a serrated face for better grip
  • Replaceable shingle gauge and blade
  • Has its nail claw

CONS:

  • Difficult to find blade replacement
  • Cannot fully replace a regular hammer

Lathe Aze Fiberglass Hammer: Best Value 

The Lathe Aze Fiberglass is by The Stiletto Tool Company [R]. They’re renowned for producing top quality hand tools.

This hatchet boasts twice as much durability between its head and its handle. Many love how it’s easy to grip through its straight and hybrid curved design.

Design-wise, it’s ergonomically built. You can work on heavy roofing projects without feeling fatigued in your arms.

It’s of fiberglass material and only weighs 1.3 lbs. For a better grip on nails, its head comes with a serrated face.

It also comes with a built-in nail claw, making it suitable for residential remodeling and framing.

Having an ergonomic design is an advantage in getting the roof job done fast. 

If you’re after these, the Lathe Aze Fiberglass is your best option!

PROS:

  • Retro-style hatchet head
  • Serrated face and built-in nail claw
  • Extremely Lightweight
  • Ergonomic design and rubber mold for easy grip
  • 10 times less shock reduction grip

CONS:

  • Lesser durability than steel

Picard 007910: Best Functionality

The Picard 007910 is one of the German-built roofing hammers offered in the market [R]. It’s distinguished by its solid steel shank material and leather handle.

These two were fused for ease of use. Specifically, it’s known to prevent twisting.

Among other roofing hatchets, the Picard has a heavier weight of 2 lbs. Design-wise, it comes with an 11-inch handle and a 7-inch head.

You’ll also find it easy to strike nails through its crosshatch face and magnetic nail holder.

You can also use its pointed tip to punch holes through slate shingles with precision.

For usability, it’s most suitable for slate roofing projects. It also gets the job done well for construction and carpentry.

The Picard is perfect for optimal use while preventing accidents. It’s GS-tested, which guarantees your protection.

If you prefer a hammer that ensures safety and reliability, this is a good option to consider.

PROS:

  • Steel material resists corrosion and rusting
  • Crosshatch face for nail grip
  • GS-tested for safety
  • Pointed tip for punching holes in slate shingles
  • The leather handle prevents twisting

CONS:

  • Only the face is magnetic, not the whole head
  • The leather handle is prone to fading

AJC Adjustable Hatchet

The AJC Adjustable Hatchet is a wooden and steel hammer built for shock absorbance [R].

Among other products, it resists shock best because of its hickory handle.

You’ll also find an adjustable sliding gauge, which you can replace over time. The gauge is also adjustable on both sides, from 4-8 inches.

The head comes with a serrated face. This helps you achieve precision when striking nails through slated shingles.

It’s 1.42 lbs in weight. The hatchet is also fabricated through heat treatment and drop forged carbon steel.

If you’re looking for the best shock absorbance, this is a nice option to consider.

PROS:

  • High-grade hickory blade for shock absorption
  • Adjustable sliding gauge
  • Head comes with a serrated face for better nail grip
  • Very light in weight

CONS:

  • Wooden handle isn’t as durable
  • Hard to replace the gauge

Qualities of a Good Roofing Hatchet

We’ve now gone through the best roofing hammers to complete your toolbox. Have you chosen the best one for you?

For professional roofers, hammer specs and qualities help determine what gets the required job done.

Before you get too excited about buying, here are qualities of a good roofing hatchet to look into:

Handle Type

How comfortable or how quick you can work with the hatchet depends on its handle.

A handle comes in different sizes, lengths, weight, and material. It may also be concealed with rubber for a better grip.

It also has different resistances to shock, depending on its material.

Material

Wooden handles are capable of strong shock absorption. It provides users a comfortable and easy grip in use.

Over time, its wood material deteriorates, which may cause it to break.

You can replace its wooden handle, as needed. But it may cost you more than getting a more durable one.

A steel hammer lasts you longer compared to its wooden counterpart.

Contrarily, it’s shock absorbance is weaker than of wooden material. This causes a vibration that spreads from your elbow to your shoulder.

Fiberglass is a unique type of material for roofing hammers. It showcases a lightweight material that’s also tough.

Compared to steel hammers, you can’t expect this not to break.

Weight

The standard hammer weight used in construction ranges from 20 to 30 oz.

Give it a couple of test swings to gauge which weight is best. This helps you know whether it’s comfortable to use or not.

You’ll also have to know the type of roof job you’ll do to choose the best hammer weight.

Shock Absorption

Roof works require hours of the strenuous pounding of nails through slate shingles.

Using it regularly can cause certain conditions if the hammer doesn’t absorb vibration well.

If this concerns you, opt for a wooden handle or one with a shock absorption handle.

Final Verdict

Choosing among the best roofing hatchets can be tough. But it’s a great tool to invest in if you’re serious about roof works.

Our best pick is the AJC Magnet Roofing for its unique face, gauge, and built-in features.

It’s suitable for heavy reconstruction works. It also helps you to do an efficient job.

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